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How To Swim Front Crawl Stroke

Updated: Sep 7, 2023


The front crawl technique is the most common swim stroke. It is a fast stroke that is used in freestyle swimming. The arms move alternately while the legs kick in a flutter kick style. The head remains in line with the body throughout the stroke.


The front crawl stroke is an efficient stroke that uses a small amount of energy to move through the water. It is a good stroke for long-distance swimming and aerobic training.


freestyle arm position
Extend your arms forward and keep them parallel to the surface of the water

Arms - Alternating arm strokes


One of the most important things to keep in mind when swimming is your arms. In freestyle, you want to extend your arms forward and keep them parallel to the surface of the water. A longer stroke or a large arm stroke can be beneficial in order to swim faster and to allow for a recovery phase within the stroke.


This may seem like a small detail, but it makes a big difference in how efficient your stroke is. When your arms are parallel to the water, they create less resistance and help you move through the water more easily.


In addition, keeping your arms parallel helps you maintain a more streamlined body position, which also helps reduce drag. So next time you're swimming, be sure to focus on keeping your arms parallel to the water surface for a faster, more efficient stroke.


swimming student practicing kicking

Legs - Leg Action


Keep your legs together and kick them in a steady motion


One of the most important things to keep in mind when swimming front crawl is to keep your legs together and kick them in a steady motion. This will help you move through the water more efficiently and prevent you from getting fatigued too quickly.

Additionally, it's important to keep your knees bent slightly and ankles relaxed as you kick so that you're not putting too much strain on your joints. With practice, you'll be able to perfect your leg technique and make swimming a breeze.


Head Position


Neutral Position - Turn Your Head using bilateral breathing

Your head position is important in the front crawl stroke, as it helps to aerate the lungs and keep the body upright in the water.


There are three main head positions: neutral, high, and low. Neutral is the most common head position, as it helps to keep the body balanced in the water.


High and low positions are used to increase speed and generate more power. The high position lifts the chin out of the water, while the low position keeps the chin close to the chest. Both positions can be beneficial, but they should only be used when necessary.


Excessive head movement can disrupt the body's natural balance and negatively affect your swimming speed.


swimming front crawl

Breathing - Efficient Swimming


Breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth


When swimming front crawl, it is important to keep your head above water at all times in order to breathe properly. You should be looking straight down at the bottom of the pool, and taking breaths at regular intervals.


If you need to take a breath sooner than usual, you can do a short forward roll to bring your head up out of the water. Inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth, making sure to exhale fully before taking another breath.

If you are swimming in open water, be aware of your surroundings so that you can avoid swallowing any water. Practice exhaling forcefully underwater to help you get used to breathing while swimming front crawl.

With a little practice, you'll be able to breathe easily and rhythmically.


Stay relaxed and focused on your technique


swimmer relaxing in a pool
Remember: Breathing Technique - Toes Pointed - Elbow High - Arms outstretched

When swimming front crawl, it is important to stay relaxed and focus on technique. One way to stay relaxed is to take slow, deep breaths and to exhale fully. This will help to control your heart rate and prevent you from getting dizzy.


It is also important to keep your head still, body forward and your eyes focused on the pool floor. This will help you maintain good body alignment and reduce drag.


When it comes to technique, it is important to keep your arms straight and extend them fully with each stroke. Your hands should enter the water at elbow level, and your fingers should be pointed down. Remember to keep your elbow close to your body as you drive your hand through the water.


Finally, make sure to kick from your hips and keep your knees straight. This will help you generate more power and move through the water more efficiently. By following these tips, you can stay relaxed and focused on technique during front crawl swim.


Now that you know the main points of swimming freestyle, go out and practice!


Perfecting your technique will take time and patience, but it will be worth it when you can swim laps with ease. Stay relaxed and focused on your form, and don't forget to breathe.


With these tips in mind, you'll be swimming like a pro in no time. If you are in need of more assistant, you can learn more strokes in our swim school.


Frequently Asked Questions About Front Crawl


What are the 5 main points of the front crawl stroke?


The front crawl is a swim stroke that is widely used in competitive swimming. It is characterized by an alternating arm motion and a flutter kick. The 5 main points of the front crawl stroke are:


1) arms should be extended forward

2) hands should enter the water at shoulder level

3) kick should be initiated from the hips

4) legs should move in a quick flutter kick motion

5) head should be kept in line with the body.


When these points are followed, the front crawl stroke can be an efficient and powerful way to swim.


How do you breathe properly when swimming front crawl?


Proper breathing is essential for swimming front crawl.


Inhale through your mouth and exhale through your nose, taking a full breath every three strokes. Remember to exhale fully before taking another breath to avoid hyperventilating.


When swimming, keep your head in line with your spine, looking down at the pool floor to maintain good body position. This will help you stay efficient in the water and avoid getting fatigued. Air exchange should happen naturally while swimming front crawl.


If you find yourself gasping for air, slow down and focus on expelling all the air from your lungs before taking another breath. With practice, you'll be able to swim front crawl with proper breathing technique.



swimmer diving in the pool

What are the best techniques for generating power?


When swimming front crawl, it is important to generate power in order to move through the water quickly and efficiently. There are a number of techniques that can be used to generate power, including arm recovery, kick frequency, and body roll.


One of the most important aspects of generating power is arm recovery. This refers to the movement of the arms from the catch position (when they are extended in front of the body) back to the midline of the body.


A powerful arm recovery begins with a strong weight transfer from the shoulder, followed by a quick snap of the elbow. The hands should then be brought all the way back to the hips before repeating the cycle.


Another key element in generating power is kick frequency. It is important to kick roughly once every second. This helps to create thrust and keep the body moving forward.


Finally, body rotation also plays an important role in generating power. Your body should roll around its long axis in order to maximize efficiency. By utilizing these techniques, it is possible to generate a great deal of power.


swimming mistakes

What are some common mistakes people make when swimming front crawl?


When front crawl swimming, it is important to keep your head and body in a straight line. Many beginners make the mistake of lifting their heads to take a breath, which causes their legs to drop and creates drag.


Instead, you should turn your head to the side and take quick, small breaths while keeping your body parallel to the water surface. You should also make sure to keep your elbows close to your sides and extend your arms forward; this will help you move through the water more efficiently.


Finally, it is important to kick from your hips, not your knees. Kicking from the hips will give you more power and help you maintain good form.



How do you breathe properly when swimming freestyle?


It is important to breathe properly in order to avoid water entering your lungs. The best way to do this is to exhale continuously while swimming, using your nose and mouth.


This will help to expel any water that may have entered your airway, and it will also help to regulate your breathing. It is also important to turn your head to the side when taking a breath, so that you can inhale through your nose and exhale through your mouth. By following these guidelines, you can ensure that you are breathing properly when swimming freestyle.



swim instructor teach students

Conclusion


Swimming front crawl can be a great way to get exercise and move through the water quickly. It is important to use proper technique in order to generate power and stay efficient. By using the techniques we discussed, such as a complete stroke cycle, maintaining your centre line, proper hand entry, arm recovery, kick frequency, and body roll among many others.


As you can tell, there is a great deal of nuance that goes into perfecting the front crawl technique. If you would like help improving your freestyle stroke, consider working with one of our certified instructors today.





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